How to Understand Massage Oils
When you first start out learning about Ili massage oils, it can seem a little daunting. However, it isn't as hard as it seems to learn the basics and to quickly come up to scratch on the use and properties of such oils. This basic guide for beginners seeks to assist you as you become more proficient in massage therapy.
The main purpose of massage oils is to lubricate the skin to reduce friction while performing a massage. This helps give a smooth glide and easy workability to the skin surface. Some of the secondary include nourishing the skin and acting as a "base", or "carrier" oil for aromatherapy essential oils.
The different attributes we can compare are how the oil spreads, how easily it is absorbed, its nourishing and moisturizing properties and the smell. Other factors to consider are the cost, the ease of cleaning, and the way it is processed. Generally speaking, the best oil will be extra virgin cold pressed, as this process maintains the highest level of purity while retaining most of the natural nutrients.
There are several basic oils that are most popular for massage:
Almond oil:  probably the most widely used massage oil is sweet almond oil. It spreads easily, and is very nourishing to the skin. It also serves as an excellent carrier oil because the smell is not too overpowering. It can be found in most health food stores and body shops, and is reasonably priced.
Grapeseed oil: Another popular oil is grape seed. It is easily absorbed by the skin but does not leave a “greasy” feeling after application. It is not as common as sweet almond and is usually a bit more expensive.
Sunflower oil: Sunflower oil is a low cost alternative and can usually be found at your local grocery store. It spreads easily and is a good carrier oil, but can feel a little greasy afterwards. Another thing to consider is that the majority of sunflower oils are heat pressed and have a very short shelf life.
Other base oils have certain properties that can help specific conditions like dry skin, premature aging or eczema. These can be added in varying proportions to the primary oil and some examples include olive oil, wheat germ, and jojoba.
 
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